Windows 10 October Update Re-Released

Photo of Windows 10 technical preview running in a virtual machine on a pc screen

The regular release of the Windows 10 update in October was stalled due to reported bugs. As such, Microsoft pulled back the release of the updates.

Microsoft listened to the voices of users who complained of issues with the Windows 10 update released early October. The company then halted the release process and worked on the bugs as reported by those who tried installing the updates and has now re-released the update.

Microsoft is now assuring the users that all the bugs have been taken care of and the installation can be done without any hitch.

The Update and the Issues Reported

The update, version 1809, was complete and released in October. But, of a total population of around 700 million devices running on Windows 10, less than 5 million have downloaded and installed. It is out of these that the complaints have been raised.

The main problem users faced was that immediately after the update, they found a few files missing or some data erased. The software major has now decided to operate the process of releasing the update in a gradual manner and not rushing it through.

Some Changes Incorporated

Photo of Windows 10 technical preview running in a virtual machine on a pc screen

The main problem users faced was that immediately after the update, they found a few files missing or some data erased. The software major has now decided to operate the process of releasing the update in a gradual manner and not rushing it through.

There are a few safeguards Microsoft has incorporated to provide some comfort level to the users. One is there will be a pre-verification on the device’s preparedness to receive the new update. This will mean checking the hardware compatibility and the applications will not clash with any of the programs after installation.

But before that Microsoft says the users will have to put in a request for the update. The number of people likely to receive the update on their devices will be very small. And in addition to all these, the user may receive an indication that some data loss may occur.

It might be helpful if the users create a backup on an external storage before going ahead with installing the updates. That way the risks of losing data will be averted even in the worst-case scenario.

Microsoft Didn’t Feel the Issue Was a Major One

This happens with many large technology companies when they first hear of problems with their products, hardware or software. The initial reaction is one of indifference. The reasons could be many.

Binary code with BUG and magnifying lens on black background - some bugs in software

But then, a bug is a bug and has to be fixed before it assumes larger proportions and has a serious impact on the reputation of the product or company.

One is they are so certain of their internal testing processes that they feel the user might be at fault, with a defective device and so on. The other major reason, as seen in this Microsoft case, is that there were very few people making the complaint through the official Windows feedback hub.

Obviously, the company would have considered 10 to 20 people facing the issue not so significant out of 6 million. But then, a bug is a bug and has to be fixed before it assumes larger proportions and has a serious impact on the reputation of the product or company.

More Internal Corrections Being Initiated

Microsoft is learnt to be making changes in the internal processes as well to ensure such incidents don’t occur in future. One of the steps it is taking is to fix the responsibility on the development team itself to do the testing of programs for bugs.

This was being done by a separate team entrusted with the testing function. Most software companies have separate functional teams for development and testing. By incorporating this change, Microsoft may be hoping to bring in better quality control through direct accountability fixation.

Man learning somethig from PC.

Microsoft listened to the voices of users who complained of issues with the Windows 10 update released early October.

Windows’ program management director took to posting a blog to explain to the public at large how the company goes about conducting tests of the software products and programs they develop and it is believed these posts may be continued.

These serve as educating those customers who have less knowledge about these processes and at the same time, trying to erase any misgivings the more informed customers have on the technical aspects of testing programs for bugs.

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